SHOROC State of the Region Report

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Life Expectancy Back to top

Key Indicator

Life Expectancy – Mortality Rates (Standardised Death Rate) and Median Age of Death.

Target (SHOROC Region)

  1. The SHOROC Regions mortality rate (Standardised Death Rate (SDR ) per 1000 residents) should be equivalent to or less than the Sydney Statistical Division (SD) and New South Wales (NSW) standardised death rate.
  2. The Median Age of Death should remain stable or increase over time.

What is the current situation/trend?

1. The SHOROC Regions mortality rate (Standardised Death Rate (SDR) per 1000 residents) should be equivalent to or less than the Sydney Statistical Division (SD) and New South Wales (NSW) standardised death rate.

on-track Indicator is on-track

The SDR per 1000 residents in 2010 for the SHOROC Region is 4.95.

This is 0.45 less than the SD and 0.75 less than the NSW SDR and meets the target of this indicator.

Standardised Death Rate per 1000 people for SD & NSW (2011) Source: ABS Data 2011 (Released 8 November 2012)
Area Indirect standardised death rate Indirect Standardised death rate compared to SHOROC Region
SHOROC Region 4.95 N/A
SD 5.4 +0.45
NSW 5.7 +0.75

Refer to ABS Website: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/3302.02011?OpenDocument (Table 6.1).

2. The Median Age of Death should remain stable or increase over time.

not available Indicator trend not yet available

The ABS NSW State and Regional Indicators, June 2009 states that:

“In 2007 the Sydney SSDs with the highest median age at death were Central Northern Sydney, Northern Beaches and Lower Northern Sydney (all almost 84 years). The Blacktown SSD recorded the lowest median age of 76 years”. 

ABS has not provided an update to these Regional Indicators at the time of collecting this baseline data. However, ABS ‘3302.0 -Deaths, Australia, 2010’  does indicate that in 2007 the Indirect Standardised Death Rate for SD was 82 yrs and 81.4yrs for NSW.

This illustrates the fact that Northern Beaches residents were living 2 years more than the SD average and 2.6 years more than the NSW average in 2007.

Why use this indicator and what does this mean for the overall Health and Wellbeing of the SHOROC Region?

Life expectancy is an indicator of how long a person can expect to live on average given prevailing mortality rates. Technically, it is the average number of years of life remaining to a person at a specified age, assuming current age-specific mortality rates continue during the person’s lifetime.

Life expectancy is a common measure of population health in general, and is often used as a summary measure when comparing different populations (such as for international comparisons). For example, high life expectancy indicates low infant and child mortality, an ageing population, and a high quality of healthcare delivery. Life expectancy is also used in public policy planning, especially as an indicator of future population ageing in developed nations.

The expected length of a life is inversely related to the mortality rates at that time. In Australia, life expectancy has increased significantly over the past century, reflecting the considerable falls in mortality rates, initially from infectious diseases and, in later years, from cardiovascular disease.

SHOROC is using these indicators that comprise a suite of indicators to determine what the state of play is in, when measuring the overall health and wellbeing of the SHOROC Region.

Last reviewed/updated July 2013